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Saturday, April 25, 2020 | History

2 edition of attempt to explain some of the principal phaenomena of electricity by means of an elastic fluid found in the catalog.

attempt to explain some of the principal phaenomena of electricity by means of an elastic fluid

Henry Cavendish

attempt to explain some of the principal phaenomena of electricity by means of an elastic fluid

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Published by s.n. in [London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Electricity -- Early works to 1850

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby the Honourable Henry Cavendish, F.R.S.
    GenreEarly works to 1850
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. 584-677, [2] fold. leaves of plates :
    Number of Pages677
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19252203M

    The principal outcome of the Leyden Jar and Franklin's lightning conductor was a strongly marked sense of the dichotomy between nebulous or atmospheric electricity, as embodied in Franklin's highly-charged thundercloud, and the rapid power of the shock, as embodied in the lightning bolt. The first attempt to explain electrical phenomena was undertaken by the American physicist Benjamin Franklin in lie believed that they were due to some „'electrical liquid” (“fluid. "This fluid I do not find to alter the appearance of the endochrome of Algae more than distilled water alone does after some time, and there is certainly less probability of confervoid filaments making their appearance in the preparations; and there would seem to be nothing to prevent such a growth from taking place when the object is mounted.


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attempt to explain some of the principal phaenomena of electricity by means of an elastic fluid by Henry Cavendish Download PDF EPUB FB2

An attempt to explain some of the principal phaenomena of electricity by means of an elastic fluid by Henry Cavendish 1 edition - first published in Not in Library. First Published Paper on Electricity: An Attempt to Explain Some of the Principal Phænomena of Electricity, By Means of an Elastic Fluid pp Get access.

Book summary views reflect the number of visits to the book and chapter landing : Henry Cavendish. An Attempt to Explain Some of the Principal Phaenomena of Electricity, by means of an Elastic Fluid- By the Honourable Henry Cavendish, F. () ().jpg 3, × 3,; KB Apparatus for the treatment of lupus, etc.

Wellcome Ljpg 1, × 1,; KB. Henry Cavendish FRS (/ ˈ k æ v ən d ɪ ʃ /; 10 October – 24 February ) was an English natural philosopher, scientist, and an important experimental and theoretical chemist and is noted for his discovery of attempt to explain some of the principal phaenomena of electricity by means of an elastic fluid book, which he termed "inflammable air".

He described the density of inflammable air, which formed water on combustion, in a paper, On Factitious : Copley medal. AN ATTEMPT TO EXPLAIN SOME OF THE PRINCIPAL PHÆNOMENA OF ELECTRICITY, BY MEANS OF AN ELASTIC FLUID pp Get access.

Book summary views reflect the number of visits to the book and chapter landing pages. Total views: 0 *Author: James Clerk Maxwell, Henry Cavendish. An Attempt to Explain Some of the Principal Phaenomena of Electricity, by means of an Elastic Fluid- By the Honourable Henry Cavendish, F.

() ().jpg 3, × 3,; KB Annales de chimie et de physique () ().jpg 1, × 1,; KB. 1 Henry Cavendish, "An Attempt to Explain some of the Principal Phaenomena of Electricity, by means of an Elastic Fluid," Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society,; reprinted in The Electrical Researches of the Honourable Henry Cavendish, ed.

James Clerk Maxwell (Cambridge, ), pp. Cavendish' attempt to explain some of the principal phaenomena of electricity by means of an elastic fluid book this argument to the electrical case of a uniformly charged sphere containing an internal charged particle of like charge and remarked attempt to explain some of the principal phaenomena of electricity by means of an elastic fluid book 6 The Hon.

Cavendish, `An Attempt to Explain some of the Principal Phaenomena of Electricity by means of an Elastic Fluid', Phil. Trans., 61 (I), ; reprinted op.

cit. note Cited by: Moreover, the other paper on elec- tricky which Cavendish did publish, "An attempt to explain some of the principal phaenomena of electricity, bv means of an elastic fluid," had firmly established his authority as an electrician; and in the follow- ing year he was appointed to a committee with the very practical task of providing protection Cited by: 4.

Both Barlow’s letter “On the Temporary Magnetic Effect Induced in Iron Bodies by Rotation” and Cavendish’s paper “An Attempt to Explain Some of the Principal Phaenomena of Electricity, by Means of an Elastic Fluid” were published in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, available to Green at the Nottingham Author: Rachel Harding, Michael Harding.

Henry Cavendish FRS (10 October – 24 February ) was a British scientist noted for his discovery of hydrogen or what he called "inflammable air". [1] He described the density of inflammable air, which formed water on combustion, in a paper "On Factitious Airs".

Antoine Lavoisier later reproduced Cavendish's experiment and gave the element its name. „An Attempt to Explain Some of the Principal Phaenomena of Electricity, by means of an Elastic Fluid”.

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. — An Attempt to Explain Some of the Principal Phaenomena of Electricity, by Means of an Elastic Fluid. PT –; Sci. Pap. 1: 33– — (a).

An Account of Some Attempts to Imitate the Effects of the Torpedo by Electricity. Being an Attempt to Resolve These Phaenomena into a General Law of Nature.

London. Creighton, Charles (). ish’s paper ‘‘An Attempt to Explain Some of the Principal Phaenomena of Electricity, by Means of an Elastic Fluid’’ () were published in the Philosophical Transactions of.

Full text of "Catalogue of the Wheeler gift of books, pamphlets and periodicals in the library of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers" See other formats. Full text of "The electrical researches, written between and " See other formats.

"An Attempt to Explain Some of the Principal Phaenomena of Electricity, by means of an Elastic Fluid". Philosophical Transactions doi: /rstl LONDON. Printed and sold by E. Cave, at St. John's Gate (Price 2s. PREFACE. It may be necessary to acquaint the reader, that the following observations and experiments were not drawn up with a view to their being made publick, but were communicated at different times, and most of them in letters wrote on various topicks, as matters only of private amusement.

The hypothesis that stands at the head of Cavendish’s second theory of electricity reads: “There is a substance, which I call the electric fluid, the particles of which repel each other and attract the particles of all other matter with a force inversely as some less power of the distance than the cube: the particles of all other matter.

Some turn the wheel of electricity; some suspend rings to a lodestone, and find that what they did yesterday, they can do again to-day.—Some register the changes of the wind, and die fully convinced that the wind is changeable.—There are men yet more profound, who have heard that two colorless liquors may produce a color by union, and that.

This is a reproduction of a book published before This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process.

Professor Fitzgerald says: "Ether must be the means by which electric and magnetic forces exist, it should explain chemical actions, and if possible gravity." The law of sympathetic vibration explain chemical affinities a sympathetic attractive, but inherent, force; in short, as gravity.

Thomas Young. British Physicist, Physician and Egyptologist. Thomas Young's career straddles the turn of the nineteenth some ways he was an old-style natural philosopher, dabbling in many fields—physics, physiology, medicine, linguistics, navigation, insurance—and more concerned with ideas than applications.

Under the word brain, in these observations, I comprehend all that lies within the cavity of the skull, i.e. the cerebrum, or brain properly so called, the cerebellum, and the medulla oblongata. This proposition seems to be sufficiently proved in the writings of physicians and anatomists; from the structure and functions of the several organs of the human body; from experiments on living.

A History of the Theories of Aether and Electricity - The Classical Theories E.T. Whittaker. Excellent treatment of Electrodynamics and Relativity Theory from an honest historical point of view.

Whittaker's views are suppressed because he was brave enough to tell the truth about the factual contributions of Einstein to the Relativity Theory.

An Attempt to Explain Some of the Principal Phaenomena of Electricity, by means of an Elastic Fluid: By the Honourable Henry Cavendish, F. S Article Jan Author: Jaime Wisniak. The metamorphic function of heat relatively to electricity was employed by Professor William Thomson, in a paper on Thermo-Electricity, read to the Royal Society of Edinburgh in May ("Trans.

Roy. Soc. Edin.," vol. xxi.), and was the means of anticipating some most remarkable laws, afterwards confirmed by experiment. Some other Principle was necessary for putting Bodies into Motion; and now they are in Motion, some other Principle is necessary for conserving the Motion.

— Sir Isaac Newton From Opticks, (, 2nd ed. ), Book 3, Qu The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Complete Works in Philosophy, Politics and Morals of the late Dr.

Benjamin Franklin, [Vol 1 of 3], by Benjamin Franklin This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere in the United States and most other parts of the world at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.

Capillary action (sometimes capillarity, capillary motion, capillary effect, or wicking) is the ability of a liquid to flow in narrow spaces without the assistance of, or even in opposition to, external forces like effect can be seen in the drawing up of liquids between the hairs of a paint-brush, in a thin tube, in porous materials such as paper and plaster, in some non-porous.

[Read March 7. and April 4. ] P A R T. Prospect of the Subject to be treated of. WHEN we trace the parts of which this terrestrial system is composed, and when we view the general connection of those several parts, the whole presents a machine of a peculiar construction by which it is adapted to a certain perceive a fabric, erected in wisdom, to obtain a purpose worthy of the.

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If you want to find and/or build some neat gadget from the s, chances are you'll find it. In chemistry and physics, atomic theory is a scientific theory of the nature of matter, which states that matter is composed of discrete units called atoms. It began as a philosophical concept in ancient Greece and entered the scientific mainstream in the early 19th century when discoveries in the field of chemistry showed that matter did indeed behave as if it were made up of atoms.

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Humphry Davy. Account of an elastic trochar, constructed on a new principle, for tapping the hydrocele and abdomen; Account of an elastic trochar, constructed on a new principle, for tapping the hydrocele and abdomen; Account of an elastic trochar, constructed on a new principle, for tapping the hydrocele, or watery rupture.

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